[Author Prev][Author Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Author Index][Thread Index]

Re: Excerpts from alleged 5th grade math anti-textbook



So do your kids know how to compute an average, and where
did they learn, and where should they learn it if not in
math class? Is it the job of math class to teach average
and arithmetic, and if not, where are kids going to learn it?

I'm astonished by this "kids already walk into school
knowing this stuff already, it's so obvious" attitude.

-----Original Message-----
From: arn-l-owner@interversity.org
[mailto:arn-l-owner@interversity.org]On Behalf Of dancinglight
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 6:22 PM
To: arn-l@interversity.org
Subject: Re: [arn-l] Excerpts from alleged 5th grade math anti-textbook


I'm teaching investigations grade level 5 right now, have been all year, and
haven't seen anything like this, or close to this in any of my teacher's
materials. It bears no resemblance at all to what I see in my teacher's
manuals every day. Now, I can't say I've read every page of every manual,
since there are several 5th grade manuals. But I sure haven't seen it. And
my kids know range, median, and mode.

Kelley


> I copied this from my kids teacher manual for the
> new world -class math text that Lake Washington has
> adopted, and urged stopped teaching of traditional (normal)
> math. Comments? By the way, Washington State Essential
> Learning Standards and WASL definition specifies that 4th
> graders are supposed to know that average is what you get
> when you divide the sum by the number of items, and 7th
> graders are supposed to be able to add and subtract
> fractions, which is not taught at 5th or 6th grade versions
> of this text.
>
>
> Investigations grade level 5
> 159 pages
> Supported by National Science foudation
> p. 6 Investigation 1 Balancing act
>
> 5TH GRADERS SHOULD KNOW RANGE, MIDRANGE, MODE, AND MEDIAN, BUT....
>
> Ask the class to consider what single value we could use to represent
> the entire data set - a typical value. Students may suggest quantities
> such as the mode (most frequent value) [Talk about concepts most
> adults have never heard of] or the midrange, (the middle of the range;
> for example, if the range were 2 to 92, the midrange would be 47,
> halfway betwrrn 2 and 92) Others may focus on the value that has the
> biggest clump of data around it. These are all appropriate measures,
> but for this lesson, turn their attention to the median as a good
> indication of what's typical
>
> WHATEVER YOU DO DON'T USE THE AVERAGE, IT'S BEYOND ADULT COMPREHENSION
>
> You are likely to have students who suggest the arithmetic maen, or as
> they may call it, the average. They may know how to find it with the
> "add-'em -all-up -and -divide -by -the -number" technique. Although
> this algorithm is iften taught in elementary school, research has
> shown that it is often not understood, even by older students and
> adults.,At this point, it is better to stay away from the mean and the
> confusion it may introduce. Focusing on the median and related
> measures is more apprpriate for upper elementary students
>
> MEDIAN IS TOO COMPLEX TO FIGURE OUT, SEE TEACHER NOTES
>
> take some time to review the median, see Teacher Note, Finding Medians
> and other fractional parts of data sets. Although the definition
> appears simple, medians are quite complex (and you said adding and
> dividing was confusing??) and it often takes students some time to
> figure out how to find the median of a data set.
>
> KIDS CAN'T HANDLE AVERAGE, BUT THEY DARN WELL BETTER BE ABLE TO DO A
> WORLD CLASS CHART.
>
> Does the poster ask and answer an appropriate and interesting
> question?
>
> Do the data answer the question?
>
> Are the data organized in a way that communicates to the audience?
>
> Are the data summarized in a few concise sentences?
>
> Are the charts and graphs accurate? appropriate? helpful to the
> reader?
>
> Has everyone in the group participated in making the poster?
>
> In the discussion, do the students describe their data accurately?
>
> Are the students' conclusions based on the data?
>
> Are the students statements and recommendations upheld by the data?
>
> LETS KEEP IT MULTICULTURAL
>
> Multicultural extensios for all students
>
> some students might bring in newspapers from their own communities.
> Some may be in different languages
>
> discuss playgound games from different cultures
>
> UNFAMILIAR WORDS?
>
> .. some words that may be unfamiliar to students with limited
>
> injury, serious, emergency room (!@#$% emergency room??)
>
> compare, range